An American Heiress: A Review

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‘I am Cora Cash. I am very rich. I have a flour fortune, not the flower you can smell but the flour you make bread with. Bread, you know, is the stuff of life. Would you like to kiss me? Most men want to but I am just too rich.’ And then she felt the darkness coming again, and before the young man could answer, she fainted into his arms.

An American Heiress
By: Daisy Goodwin
Publisher: St. Martins
Purchased at: Barnes and Noble
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 Why I Read It

I love British period pieces: everything by Jane Austen, Dickens, the Brontes. Lately though, I’ve gotten away from these classics in favor of more contemporary fiction. But I still love a good story about British high society, which is why I became a Downton Abbey devotee during the show’s run. A fellow anglophile friend of mine recommended The American Heiress as a salve for my Downtown withdrawal. Sadly, it doesn’t help my missing Dan Stevens as Matthew Crawley, but otherwise Goodwin’s debut novel was right up my alley.

Caveat: you have to be interested in this time period. If not, you probably won’t be as riveted as I was by this book.

Premise

The American Heiress is about the rich and beautiful Cora Cash, whose parents have more money than God in turn of the century New York City. But Cora’s mother is after the one thing that her money can’t buy—a title—and so they set off for England in search of an eligible bachelor who can supply one. Fortuitously, Cora takes a spill off her horse in the woods belonging to the Duke of Wareham. A whirlwind romance follows, but being a Duchess isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. British High Society is as unforgiving as it is secretive, and Cora, the American and outsider, has a lot to learn in order to manage her new life.  Continue reading “An American Heiress: A Review”

By the Book: A Review

Seeing Adam’s library now made me feel ill with want. I felt like he’d stolen part of my dreams, like he was living the life I’d wanted. “This was supposed to be my library,” I wanted to scream. Was he taunting me? Showing me the life I could have had if we hadn’t broken up?

By The Book

By the Book
By: Julia Sonneborn
Published by: Gallery Books
Purchased on: Amazon
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Why I read it

I bought this book on a whim. I was looking for future book club picks on Amazon, and this title popped. When I read the premise—a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s Persuasion—my heart dropped a little. For NaNoWriMo 2017, I also wrote a modern retelling of Persuasion, which I’m still working on. So, naturally, I had to see what this one was like, and I bought it on the spot.

Premise

Anne Corey is living the dream as an English Professor at a small college in California. Unfortunately, that dream also includes crushing student loan debt and the struggle of trying to get an academic book published—not to mention that her job security depends on getting said book published. Add to that an aging father who needs to be moved to an assisted living facility nearby, and she’s got quite enough to be going on with outside of her teaching load. But then, everything gets a little more complicated as her ex-fiancé makes his debut as the new president of the college. Continue reading “By the Book: A Review”

Ready Player One Review

You only know what I want you to know. You only see what I want you to see.
–Art3mis to Wade, Ready Player One

RPO

Ready Player One
By:
Ernest Cline
Publisher: Broadway Books
Purchased On: Amazon
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I didn’t expect to like this book as much as I did. My husband mentioned it maybe a year ago, but then he said the word “video games” and I promptly lost interest. Then more recently, a good friend and fellow bibliophile told me, in no uncertain terms, that I had to read this book. So, I gave it a shot.

Ready Player One is about Wade Watts (aka Parzival) who is by all accounts a lonely gamer dude whose life pretty much sucks. The year 2044 is basically a hot mess for humanity. Spoiler alert: Global Warming is real. Luckily for Wade, he can spend almost all of his time in the OASIS, where everything doesn’t suck. He spends most of his time hunting for the Easter Egg left behind by eccentric creator of the Oasis, Jim Halliday. Mostly this involves a lot of 80’s nostalgia. As the game intensifies, there are real life consequences, and Wade is no longer fighting just for the multibillion-dollar prize (though that helps), he’s fighting for his life.  Continue reading “Ready Player One Review”